Game Of Thrones Ending Explained: Why Was Bran Stark Chosen As King Of The Seven Kingdoms?

In 2011, HBO released the first episode of the fantasy drama series Game of Thrones, based on George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire book series. Over the course of the next eight years, fans followed the epic story of Westeros, a land filled with warring families, powerful dragons, and mysterious magic.

The series finale of Game of Thrones aired in May 2019 and left many fans with mixed feelings. While some praised the show for its thrilling ending, others felt betrayed by the lack of closure and unanswered questions.

In this article, we’ll take a look at the finale and explain how it wrapped up the story of Game of Thrones. We’ll also explore the various fan theories that were discussed during the show’s run and how they might’ve affected the ending.

The Iron Throne

The final two episodes of the series focused heavily on the fate of the Iron Throne, the symbol of Westeros power. After a long and bloody battle, the forces of Daenerys Targaryen and Jon Snow faced off against Cersei Lannister and Euron Greyjoy’s army.

In the end, Daenerys emerged victorious and set out to rebuild the land. However, her plan to “break the wheel” of Westerosi politics by destroying the old system and replacing it with her own failed, as Jon Snow stabbed her to death.

With Daenerys gone, the Iron Throne was up for grabs. In the series finale, it was given to Bran Stark, the crippled ex-lord of Winterfell. Not only was Bran chosen to rule, but he was also given the title of King of the Six Kingdoms.

This choice was unexpected, as Bran had not been actively involved in the game of thrones. However, it made sense. Bran was the Three-Eyed Raven, a powerful magical being capable of seeing the past, present, and future. He was also the only person who could unite the fractured nations of Westeros.

The Fan Theories

Game of Thrones was a show that spawned countless fan theories and speculation. One of the most popular theories was the “Azor Ahai” theory. This theory posited that Jon Snow was the legendary hero who would save the world from the White Walkers.

Other popular theories included the “Cleganebowl” theory, which predicted a fight between the brothers Sandor and Gregor Clegane, and the “Prince That Was Promised” theory, which claimed that either Daenerys or Jon Snow would be the savior of Westeros.

Although none of these theories were confirmed in the series finale, they may have had an influence on the ending. For example, the “Prince That Was Promised” theory could explain why Bran was chosen as King. After all, he was the only person who could truly unite the realm.

The Unanswered Questions

Despite the series finale wrapping up the story of Game of Thrones, there are still a few unanswered questions. One of the most glaring is the fate of the White Walkers. Although they were defeated by Arya Stark and the forces of Daenerys, it’s unclear what happened to them after the battle.

Another question is the fate of the various characters. While some characters were given a happy ending, others were left with an uncertain future. For example, Sansa Stark was crowned Queen in the North, but it’s unclear what will become of her.

The series finale of Game of Thrones left many fans with mixed feelings. While some praised the show for its thrilling ending, others were left feeling betrayed by the lack of closure and unanswered questions.

Despite these issues, the finale wrapped up many of the plotlines and gave fans closure on the story of Westeros. The Iron Throne was given to Bran Stark, the Three-Eyed Raven, who was chosen to be the King of the Six Kingdoms.

Although some fan theories were left unconfirmed, they may have influenced the ending of the show. The “Prince That Was Promised” theory, in particular, could explain why Bran was chosen as King.

Overall, the series finale of Game of Thrones was a fitting end to the show. While there are still some unanswered questions, the ending provided fans with closure on the story of Westeros.